Alternative to RCC With Cisco and OCS 2007 R2

Often I run into customers that want Remote Call Control with their current phone system as an integration architecture with OCS 2007 R2. Personally I see the benefit to remote call control in LCS, and OCS 2007 R1, but not with the R2 release, and especially with Wave 14 so close. Many times I have had to explain the different scenarios, and why I think a different architecture is a better way to approach this. Today I had to develop this information for a Cisco Call Manager implementation, and wanted to have a reference point, as well as share my thoughts on the subject.

To give a brief background, the customer wanted RCC with Cisco, they currently have an OCS infrastructure in place, and wanted to add the RCC functionality to that environment. In order to do this, they would need to upgrade to Call Manager 7, which is the very first reason to not go any further with the RCC architecture in my opinion. If you are investing in the Microsoft Unified Communications technology stack, there is no reason to dump more money into another UC product along side it.

As a summary, here is a description of what RCC is… Credit goes to this blog post http://blogs.technet.com/jkunert/archive/2008/07/30/voice-scenarios-with-ocs-2007.aspx

This is a description from the R1 release of OCS 2007 but still holds true today.

Remote Call Control (RCC)

Overview

Also this voice scenario was already available in OCS 2007 predecessor Live Communications Server 2005 SP1. The users OC client does not act as a soft phone, does not need an audio or audio/video device connected to the PC and the user is not able to make or receive phone calls by using her/his PC. This is not a VoIP scenario!

User experience

In this scenario, an OCS 2007 user has a PBX or IP PBX phone with an extension (e.g. 1212) standing on her/his desk. In addition to that, Office Communicator (OC) 2007 is installed on the user’s PC.

In the office

On an incoming call the user’s PBX phone rings as well as that she/he receives an incoming call notification (pop-up window) on the bottom right of her/his PC screen, showing the Calling Party Number (Caller ID, phone number of the person who called) and also the caller’s name (if OC could resolve the phone number to a name by matching the phone number against Active Directory or Outlook contacts). The user is able to accept the call by picking up the receiver of the PBX/IP PBX phone or by clicking on the pop-up window for the incoming call on her/his PC. In both cases, media (voice stream) will stay on the PBX/IP PBX and there will be no VoIP connection to OC! The user does not need an audio device for telephony connected to her/his PC.

At home/on the internet

If the user receives an incoming call to her/his office number while being connected to the company’s IT environment over the internet (e.g. at home), the users PBX/IP PBX phone will ring in the office (what she/he most likely will not be able to hear J) as well as that she/he can see the pop-up window generated by OC on her/his PC. Accepting the call by clicking on the pop-up window will result in this scenario that the phone in the office will activate the speaker phone, but the user is not able to use her/his PC to talk to the caller. No VoIP connection through the internet is established! (However, the user can redirect an incoming call to her/his mobile phone and can pick up the call this way while working remotely.)

How it works in a nutshell

A CSTA Gateway (GW) needs to be installed between OCS 2007 and the PBX/IP PBX. Some PBX/IP PBX systems come with a CSTA interface natively so there is no need for an additional GW. Between OCS and the PBX/IP PBX call control commands will be sent, packed into a SIP INFO message that uses a long-lasting SIP dialog between OCS and the CSTA GW. The CSTA GW converts these call control messages into a format that the PBX/IP PBX understands. A CSTA GW is not a media GW so voice cannot be converted by a CSTA GW from a TDM (Time Division Multiplexing) or PSTN protocol to VoIP! OC can only control the functions of the PBX/IP PBX phone.

 

With a Cisco integration, we would actually be able to do direct sip as long as the following software requirements are met on the Cisco side:

  • Cisco Unified Communications Manager Release 7.0(2)
  • Cisco Unified Presence Release 7.0(3) with E.164 patch for RCC

One of the key features of the Microsoft OCS Platform is the ability to have not only integrated IM and Voice calling, but also conferencing, all within the same application, and all available through a single click. Any communication can be escalated to a conference by inviting PSTN or VOIP participants at any time. When you introduce the remote call control scenario this is no longer available. A Key thing to point out is that a user in this scenario cannot make or receive calls using communicator, they still must use the Cisco phone in all scenarios, which virtually eliminates the remote worker benefits of OCS.  Below is the list of other limitations taken from the Cisco Documentation on this configuration:

Features Not Supported

· Microsoft OC logon from two locations

· Call Forwarding

· Location Based

· Phone Settings

· Conferencing through remote call control

Limitations

· Conferencing: OCS 2007 R2 does not support call conferencing through remote call control. Conferencing is available in IP Phone

only or OC only call scenarios.

· Call forward setting on IP phone: Call forward setting made on the Cisco IP phone (desktop), using its soft key button or the Cisco

UCM phone configuration page, is not reflected by the Microsoft OC GUI. As of Microsoft OCS 2007 release, this feature is not

supported. The Microsoft OC can override any call forward setting manually configured on the IP Phone and vice versa.

· Call Forward Setting from OC: Call forward setting from the OC through remote call control (RCC) fails on the IP Phone when the IP

Phone is initially configured with an E.164 DN. If the IP Phone is reconfigured to a non-E.164 DN then back to the E.164 DN, the

call forward setting from OC through RCC will work. This is a known issue on Cisco UCM 7.0(2) and has been documented in

CDETS CSCsy62620 to be fixed in a future release.

· Do Not Disturb (DND): DND is an unsupported feature with respect to CUP integration. Thus, any OC client with DND feature

enabled, will still have any received calls routed to its controlled IP Phone.

· Multiple Point of Presence (MPOP): As of the CUP release 6.0(1), the MPOP feature where a Microsoft OC user is logged in from

more than one location is not supported by CUP. Support for this feature affects other interoperability features between the Cisco

CUP and the Microsoft OCS. The affected features include basic placement and teardown of calls and locations-based call forwarding.

These features are inherent to MPOP and without support for this feature, the user experiences loss of device and call control when

logged in multiple locations.

· Transport Layer Security (TLS) connection between CUP and OCS: this feature was not tested in this release.

As you can see, you quickly start to lose a lot of the functionality of OCS. I will stress that the above is strictly related to Cisco, and may not be completely accurate for other RCC Scenarios.

The other option, and most optimal solution in my opinion can be most closely referred to as a standard Enterprise Voice Scenario. Really, it is the cheap way of doing remote call control.

Last year I had multiple voice deployments which had to provide interop between OCS and the existing PBX, mostly Avaya and Cisco systems. A key requirement of all of these deployments was the ability to pilot OCS functionality but also have access to their old phone for use. The architecture we used to provide this can be seen below. We had to make a connection between the OCS environment and the PBX, whether it was a Sip trunk to cisco, or a PRI connection via media gateway to the other systems. From there we have two options for routing incoming/outbound calls for OCS enabled users.

The first scenario is where the PBX controls the call routing. All PRIs, or SIP trunks come directly into the PBX, from there you have routing rules to route certain numbers over a trunk to OCS. This can be accomplished by setting routing rules at the PBX level, or simply forwarding your PBX Desk phone to your OCS extension, which will route it over to the OCS Trunk. It is important to note that in both scenarios you are configured for different extension on the PBX and OCS. Where your “real” extension goes depends on how you wish to route/forward calls. Regardless, any DID numbers, or existing extensions are still usable, it’s just a matter of getting the call there. In this scenario for example, you may have “fake extension” in OCS, and when your existing extension is rung, your cisco phone forwards the call to your OCS extension, in the PBX this new block of OCS extensions is configured explicitly to route over that new trunk, this is the simplest way to make this connection happen with the least amount of changes on the existing PBX environment.

The other scenario lets OCS control the call routing. In this scenario all PSTN calls destined for OCS Enabled users go directly to OCS. This can be more difficult to implement at first, but once it is in place, it provides a very smooth transition. This can be accomplished from a direct SIP trunking connection to an OCS mediation server, or a PRI/POTS connection from a provider, into a media gateway, which then sends the calls on to the OCS mediation server. It is possible to move all incoming PRI connections to a media gateway, which would then control all calls. From there that media gateway can send to the PBX or OCS. In the Cisco world, this could actually be a 2800 or 3800 series ISR. To some people this is a bit scary to hear at first, but really, your current PRI lines come into some sort of gateway device as it is, this would provide the same functionality. The gateways used are by companies like Dialogic and NET with great experience doing this for years for traditional PBX systems, so it is more than reliable. From here, there is also a trunk setup to the PBX to route extension dialing, as well as for simultaneously ringing the legacy PBX phone.  In both scenarios the voicemail can be sent to exchange unified messaging or back to the PBX voicemail system. When OCS has no answer, it can make this choice. The PBX will be smart enough when the call comes back and is tagged with no answer, to send it directly to voicemail instead of creating an endless ringing loop.

In scenario two, if the media gateway takes all PSTN calls in, it will have some basic routes on it. Routes that control sending OCS enabled users to the mediation server, and then a default route which will send everything to cisco. Basically, if you had 5 users enabled for OCS. You would have a rule on the gateway that had 1000-1005 with a destination of the mediation server. The second route would be * (any) with a destination of the PBX. This takes the load of modifying PBX configuration.

In this specific scenario, the media gateway could be a dialogic/NET device, or simply the PRI interface on the Cisco ISR.

It is important to note that with both of these scenarios you have full functionality of both systems at any given time. You can use your cisco phone to make and receive calls, or your OC client to make and receive calls. You can also take advantage of all conferencing, and other advanced functionality that OCS has to offer like remote access.

CiscoEVScenario

There may be some things that need clearing up in this, and I am open to some feedback, but this is really what I have been going off as a reference point for myself with these deployments. Another important factor is the retirement of Dual Forking and RCC in Wave 14 of OCS set to be released this year, existing OCS 2007 R2 implementations will be supported, however new deployments will not. This has made some companies forget about RCC implementations all together.

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Posted on by Randy Wintle in Dialogic, Enterprise Voice, Exchange 2007, Exchange UM, LCS 2005 SP1, Microsoft, OCS, OCS 2007 R2, Unified Communications Leave a comment

OCS 2007 R2 Schema Prep Failure “failure occurred attempting to check the schema state. please ensure active directory is reachable”

A customer called in today with an issue preparing their OCS 2007 R2 environment. The customer had previously started installation on a 2008 R2 server, and started over with a 2008 R1 server. They had only completed the Active Directory Preparations prior to starting over. The issue was when they started on the server they were unable to see the schema prep, they were receiving this error in the install GUI:

ocsschemaprepfailure

A few interesting things here, the machine is joined to the domain, I could contact all domain controllers, I could modify the schema using the schema MMC snapin. However, the OCS install run via command line or GUI would not contact active directory.

Through some quick googling I found that the installer queries the SRV records for contacting the PDC in active directory. This SRV record is:

_ldap._tcp.pdc._msdcs. DnsDomainName

After pointing to a DNS issue, the customer realized their server was pointing to a public DNS server, not an active directory integrated server, which did not have the SRV records needed to perform these tasks. Once the DNS server was changed, the installer read the Active Directory Preparation as Completed and you could do a proper nslookup on those SRV records

srvldapquery

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Posted on by Randy Wintle in Conferencing, LCS, Microsoft, OCS, OCS 2007 R2, Unified Communications 16 Comments

January 2010 OCS 2007 R2 Server Side and Client Side Updates

Everyone is reposting the links for downloads to the new updates. The links for all of the updates can be found below….

Phone Edition: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=565595BE-6CF3-4A61-A1E4-12555749CA64&displaylang=en

Group Chat: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=E5924BF9-B042-4C53-B4A6-79C7E5C9749B&displaylang=en

Server R2: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=B3B02475-150C-41FA-844A-C10A517040F4&displaylang=en

Communicator: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=515D6DBA-4C6A-48BB-A06A-D99C5742676D&displaylang=en

Conferencing Add-in for Outlook http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/help/HA102368901033.aspx (now with a 32-bit and 64-bit option)

LiveMeeting Client http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/help/HA101733831033.aspx

Cumulative update installer is the way to go on the server side, and if you are using client version filter and device updater, I can report success (in conjunction with the link below) in our internal environment. So far nothing to report as far as bugs with the new updates, patch away!

I did want to point out a couple of blog posts coming out of these updates. One from Mike Stacy, which points out that with this newest communicator release you can now properly integrate with Outlook 2010 64bit. http://mikestacy.typepad.com/mike-stacys-blog/2010/01/january-2010-communicator-r2-update-compatible-with-office-2010-64-bit.html

Another being from Michael Sneeringer who is an OCS 2007 R2 MCM. With the newest update 64bit machines are requesting a 64bit version of communicator, or atleast a directory that has that specified. His post outlines resolving this issue, this has helped clear up a bunch of update issues internally.  http://michaelsneeringer.blogspot.com/2010/01/client-version-filtering-on-windows-x64.html

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Posted on by Randy Wintle in Uncategorized Leave a comment

Collecting OCS Performance Data For PSS

It has been a while since I have had a post over here, guess you can blame the holiday season as well as the busy beginning of the year at Winxnet. Anyways, I have been working with PSS on an issue with external live meeting through the edge for quite some time now, and with that has been lots of performance monitor collection, after clicking through all of the different collectors multiple times, I decided to create some templates to have for future use and wanted to share them. Its nothing special, no awesome script or anything complicated, but a very basic tool that may be useful to anyone going forward.

http://cid-389bd51b03b1f8f9.office.live.com/embedicon.aspx/Public/Performance%20Monitor%20Templates
Above is a link for access to these files on my sky drive. If you have any issues accessing these please leave a comment or contact me via email and I will get them to you.

They are very easy to use, once downloaded, open Reliability and Performance Monitor from either your Front End or Edge Server…

image

Expand “Data Collector Sets” and right click on the User Defined folder. Choose New->Data Collector Set

image

Name the collector set whatever you would like and make sure to choose Create from a template.

Click next to access the next page in the configuration wizard. Choose Browse and locate the XML file you downloaded containing the template information. Once you select that file the page should look like this:

image

The next two screens will ask you where to save this file, I would suggest a drive with plenty of space as these can get very large depending on the amount of traffic on your server and how long they are running.

 

When you are ready to collect data simply right click on the set you created and choose start.

image

Once you are ready to analyze data, or send to Microsoft PSS for data analysis you simply choose stop, and you will have a file in the location you specified. Microsoft PSS uses a tool called PAL(Performance Analysis of Logs) which is an open source application written by a Microsoft employee. This tool can be found here:  http://www.codeplex.com/PAL If you are feeling up to performing some of your own analysis this is a great tool to use. I may try to post some more detailed information on using this tool soon.

 

The templates included in my link include the following Counters:

 

Logical Disk

Memory

Network Interface

Objects

Paging File

Physical Disk

Process

Processor

TCPv4

Thread

All <LC: > Counters

 

Hopefully soon I will have a new post describing the fix for this strange live meeting issue, until then, Enjoy!

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Posted on by Randy Wintle in Audio/Video MCU, Conferencing, Edge, Live Meeting, Load Balancing, Microsoft, OCS, OCS 2007 R2, Unified Communications 5 Comments

Having trouble creating OCS Shares on non windows file server?

On two recent deployments our team ran into some issue when trying to create pools with file shares created on an EMC NAS device. The install wizard was not seeing those folders as setup properly so it could not complete the install. All the permissions were checked best we could see, but it still did not like the share configuration.

I decided to try creating the shares on one of the front end servers and moving on with installation, I then would xcopy the data over to the EMC NAS, and then modify the file locations for the pool.

There is a great article here that goes over the bulk of this migration process, the one difference for my situation is the xcopy from windows share over to the EMC device.

In my example my file shares were in D:OCS Shares on local folder and I had mapped the folder on the EMC containing all of the OCS Shares to Z:

xcopy “d:ocs shares” z: /e /k /o /x /y

 

This basically will copy everything in the D:ocs shares folder, including sub directories and files to the Z: drive.

All attributes, including all ACL information will be kept, and it will not prompt to overwrite any existing files.

Once we completed this xcopy, we followed the instructions in the above link to modify all WMI settings and all IIS settings, from there we were able to restart services and verify all functionality.

Obviously there is a way to get the EMC NAS file shares setup correctly, however I did not have this knowledge, and as a time saver, this was the best fix for me.

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Posted on by Randy Wintle in Conferencing, Live Meeting, Microsoft, OCS, OCS 2007 R2, Unified Communications Leave a comment

How to Disable “Schedule A Conference Call” button in Live Meeting Outlook Add-In

Some organizations will deploy LiveMeeting either without the existence of OCS, or without OCS Audio/Video Conferencing being enabled. By default, the conferencing addin for outlook has a Schedule A Conference Call button regardless of the environment you are connecting it to.

There is a registry entry that can be used to disable this button:

1. Locate and then click to select the following registry subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftwareMicrosoftLive MeetingAddins

Note Use this subkey for x86-based systems. If you are running a x64-based system, locate and click the following subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoftLive MeetingAddins

2. After you select the subkey that is specified in step 3, point to New on the Edit menu, and then click DWORD Value.

3. Type RemoveConferenceCall, and then press ENTER.

4. Right-click RemoveConferenceCall, and then click Modify.

5. In the Value data box, type 1, and then click OK.

6. On the File menu, click Exit to close Registry Editor.

If you wish to remove this setting, simply change the Value to 0 and the button will be available again.

A full list of livemeeting registry keys can be found here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd637135(office.13).aspx

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Posted on by admin in Audio/Video MCU, Conferencing, Live Meeting, Microsoft, OCS, OCS 2007 R2, Unified Communications Leave a comment

CWA Error through F5 Load Balancer: Your Connection was ended. Please Sign in Again. (Error Code: 0-1-482)

 

On a recent deployment we deployed CWA internally and externally using ISA Server 2006. The customer decided they wanted to provide high availability to the CWA service, so we introduced a hardware load balancer to provide that functionality. After we set the two servers with identical site settings behind the load balancer we started having users receive this error when connecting to the CWA site:

cwaerror1

At first glance deploying CWA through a load balancer would seem pretty basic, they are websites you access over https, however there is some key information in the R2 Documentation for deploying CWA behind a load balancer. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd441196(office.13).aspx

Communicator Web Access supports most hardware load balancers, provided that the load balancer:

  • Allows you to set the TCP idle timeout to 1,800 seconds (30 minutes). The TCP idle timeout represents the amount of time the server will wait for information during a session. If you are using a reverse proxy server (such as Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration Server) then the TCP idle timeout on that computer should also be set to 1,800 seconds.
  • Allows you to use a source network address translation (SNAT) pool if you need to handle more than 65,000 simultaneous connections. SNAT is designed to "hide" multiple servers behind a single IP address (that is, a number of servers can be accessed using just one IP address). With a SNAT pool, servers can be hidden behind multiple IP addresses.
  • Allows you to use cookie persistence when configuring session affinity. With cookie persistence, information about the actual Communicator Web Access server being used for a session is stored in an Internet cookie on the client computer. When configuring the load balancer’s session persistence profile it is recommended that you use "HTTP Cookie Insert." With this configuration method, information about the server to which the client is connected is inserted in the header of the HTTP response from that server as a cookie.

Our issue was related to the persistence profile. When a user connects to CWA they must maintain a connection to the same server as the initial connection or it will not work. The persistence profile, using a HTTP Cookie Insert method will enable this persistence.

We were using an F5 BIG IP LTM Load balancer for this deployment, we actually chose “Source Address Affinity”. Below you can seen a screenshot of the persistence profile used in this configuration.

f5cwaconfig

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Posted on by admin in CWA, F5, Load Balancing, Microsoft, OCS, OCS 2007 R2, Unified Communications 5 Comments

A/V Conferencing From External Issue- SIP 403 Forbidden Error

On a recent deployment I ran into an issue where everything was working correctly except an external user trying to join or create an Audio Video Conference. The customer had an enterprise edition consolidated configuration behind an F5 Load Balancer. Doing our initial sip traces we were able to see a 500 error when the external user would try to join or create a conference.

Start-Line: SIP/2.0 500 The server encountered an unexpected internal error

ms-diagnostics: 3080;reason="Internal Error: AddUser failed";source="front end server fqdn"

I removed most of the trace except the important parts. What you will see in the above trace is the SIP 500 error, and then at the bottom the AddUser is failing on the front end server. This exact symptom with an enterprise pool behind load balancers points to this KB article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/946091. This fix explains an issue with the load balancer being in DNAT mode instead of SNAT mode. However our F5 was using SNAT for all of the OCS traffic, and the pool setting was correctly set to not be in DNAT mode.

Running more traces another error popped up which was a SIP 403 Forbidden:

SIP/2.0 403 Forbidden

SERVER: RTCC/3.5.0.0 MRAS/2.0
ms-edge-proxy-message-trust: ms-source-type=EdgeProxyGenerated;ms-ep-fqdn=Edge Internal interfacefqdn;ms-source-verified-user=verified
Ms-diagnostics: 9006;source="Edge Internal interfacefqdn";reason="Forbidden";component="Media Relay Authentication Service"

This basically means that the front end server is not able to get media relay authentication from the edge server A/V internal interface.

If this is happening you will also see an error in the event logs:

Log Name:      Office Communications Server
Source:        OCS Audio-Video Conferencing Server
Date:          9/25/2009 4:12:14 PM
Event ID:      32018
Task Category: (1017)
Level:         Error
Keywords:      Classic
User:          N/A
Computer:     FRONT END SERVER FQDN

Description:
The Audio-Video Conferencing Server encountered an error when requesting credentials from the A/V Edge Authentication Service.

A/V Authentication Service Service URI sip:EdgeInternalFQDN@swk.pri;gruu;opaque=srvr:MRAS:HqCEupOMck6C3onsDHul1wAA, Reason: The operation has failed. See the exception’s properties as well as the logs for additional information.
Cause: The Audio-Video Conferencing Server cannot communicate with A/V Authentication Service.
Resolution:
Check the A/V Authentication Service is alive and that network connectivity exists.

Connectivity was available through the internal edge VIP as well as each individual edge server’s internal interface. Also, if you ran an A/V Conferencing Validation on each of the front end servers it would succeed on all tests.

I ran through this with PSS and there were two things we discovered. The first potential issue was on the Internal tab setting of the edge server. Per the Microsoft documentation when doing an enterprise deployment the name that should be listed on the “Internal Servers Authorized to Connect to this edge server” setting is the pool FQDN, not each individual front end server. There has been some debate about whether you should add the FQDN of each front end server to this list as well, because we were seeing the front end servers get denied access to the A/V Authentication service we decided to try it anyways.

edgeinternalsetting(Pictures Modified to protect customer info)

The other change that was made was in the forest global settings section. On the general tab you specify your internal SIP domains and you check one for the default routing domain. In this case the customer AD domain was different from the SIP domain, both were listed, however the AD Domain was checked as the domain to be used for the default routing. Once we changed that setting to have the SIP Domain as the default routing domain and restarted the services on the front end servers, A/V conferencing started functioning properly.

globaldomainsettings 
(Pictures Modified to protect customer info)

I am hoping I can remove each setting and try to narrow it down to one ,but either way the internal interface setting has proved to fix some funky issues in deployments, so both of these may want to be set regardless.

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Posted on by admin in Audio/Video MCU, Edge, Microsoft, OCS, OCS 2007 R2, Unified Communications 4 Comments

Join us for a special, invitation-only Microsoft launch event for Maine Information Technology Leaders and Professionals!

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Join us for a special, invitation-only Microsoft launch event for Maine Information Technology Leaders and Professionals!

Wednesday, October 28th 9:00-4:00

The Wyndham Hotel, South Portland

Presented by Winxnet, VTEC & Microsoft

Hello,

I’d like to invite you to join a select group of Maine IT leaders to attend the Microsoft New Efficiency launch event in South Portland.  This event will focus on how businesses like yours are using innovations in Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 to reduce costs and improve productivity.  Microsoft will be the key presenter at this event.  Seating is limited, so please register early to guarantee your seat.  REGISTER NOW!

LAUNCH OVERVIEW:

The New Efficiency – It is about how we can bring costs down and help increase business productivity while increasing IT control and reducing risk. In today’s challenging economy, Microsoft is providing the software innovations you need to help save money and be more efficient today and more effective tomorrow. Come see how these three Microsoft products will help save your business money and improve efficiency.

Windows 7: Optimized Desktop                              

· How Windows 7 can help you reduce management costs, raise productivity as part of the Windows Optimized Desktop, and manage risks through enhanced security and control.

Windows Server 2008 R2: Optimized Datacenter

· How Windows Server 2008 R2 enables dynamic provisioning and management of virtual workloads, reduces energy costs, and combines with Windows 7 to make branch offices more cost-effective and remote workers more productive.

Exchange Server 2010: Unified Communications

· How Exchange Server 2010 can simplify administration and deployment of messaging, improve archiving capabilities, and extend your messaging across multiple access points.

AGENDA

8:15-9:00 – Registration / Check In

9:00-10:00 – Keynote:  The New Efficiency

10:00-10:45 – Solutions for Optimized IT: Introduction to Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Exchange Server 2010

10:45-11:45 – Windows 7: Optimized Desktop

11:45-1:00 – Lunch/Solution Showcase

1:00-2:00 – Windows Server 2008 R2: Optimized Datacenter

2:00-3:00 – Exchange Server 2010: Unified Communications

3:00 – 3:45 – Closing Remarks

4:00-5:00 – After Hours with Sponsors

CLICK  HERE TO REGISTER!

I look forward to meeting you in person at the event!

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Posted on by admin in Uncategorized Leave a comment

Migrating the OCS Enterprise Edition Back-End Databases

There is a blog post here: http://blogs.technet.com/dodeitte/archive/2009/06/05/how-to-move-ocs-enterprise-sql-database-to-another-server.aspx

This post outlines the basic process of taking the databases offline, migrating them, mounting them in the new instance and running LCSCMD to update the pool backened.

I recently did this in a production deployment of R2 and actually found a missing step, there was also a post on the Technet forums with a user having the same issue so I figured I would post the updated process here. This may not always be the case, but a key thing to check, and what ended up being the fix in my situation was the actual pool setting in active directory.

I believe the attribute that the below command updates is msRTCSIP-BackEndServer

LCSCmd.exe /Forest /Action:UpdatePoolBackend /PoolName:<pool name> /poolbe:<SQL instance name (machineinstance name)>

When I ran through this process I found that when I opened ADSI Edit and browsed to this attribute it actually had not changed.

adsieditbackenddatabase

The DN For the pool object will be located at : CN=Poolname,CN=Pools,CN=RTC Service,CN=Microsoft,CN=System/Config Container,DC=Domain,DC=com

 

Again this may not always be the case but in my experience this was thef ix for the issue.

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Posted on by admin in LCS, LCS 2005 SP1, Microsoft, OCS, OCS 2007 R2, Unified Communications 2 Comments